Climat – fdc – en

Congo river

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The Congo River (also known as the Zaire) is over 2,720 miles (4,375 km) long. It is the fifth-longest river in the world, and the second longest in Africa – second only to the Nile River in Northeastern Africa. The Congo River flows primarily through the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the People's Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and partially through Zambia, Angola, Cameroon, and Tanzania. The Congo ranges in width from 0.5 to 10 miles (0.8 to 16 km) depending on the location and time of year.

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Ituri forest

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The Ituri Forest is a dense tropical rain forest in the northern part of the Congo River Basin in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). It covers a vast area of over 24,300 square miles (62,900 sq km) of land in central Africa. The altitude of the forest varies from 2,300 feet (700 m) in the south to 3,300 feet (1,000 m) above sea level in the north. The geographic boundaries of the Ituri Forest are difficult to define as the forest blends in with other forests and swamp regions. The Ituri borders savanna to the north, the Western Rift Valley to the east, and lowland rain forest to the south and west. The name Ituri Forest derives from the Ituri River, which runs from east to west across the forest, flowing into the Aruwimi River before emptying into the Congo River.

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Physiography of the Congo basin

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The Congo basin represents one of the most marked depressions to be found between the Sahara to its north, and the Atlantic Ocean to the south and west. It also includes the East African lakes to the east. Tributaries flow down slopes that vary from 900 to 1,500 feet into a central depression that forms the basin. It measures more than 1,200 miles north to south – from the Congo-Lake Chad watershed to the Angolan plateaus. West to east – from the Atlantic to the Nile-Congo watershed – it also measures 1,200 miles.

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Congo River : Hydrology and Transportation

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Hydrology

The Congo River's flow and water levels are affected by the rains year round. It is the effects of rainfall throughout the regions whose rivers and tributaries contribute to the Congo River that influence the fluctuations in the flow of the river. However, because the Congo basin is an immense area, the weather pattern in one particular region will not have much effect on the river's overall levels.

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Congo River Power and the Inga High Dam

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The Congo River is a potentially rich source of hydroelectric power. However, it is estimated that currently it represents only one-sixth of the world's known resources since the potential is not actually being exploited. So far, only two hydroelectric projects have been started in DRC , the Inga I and Inga II. But even now, these two sites provide more power than DRC is able to consume at present.

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Lake Tanganyika (Wikipedia)

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Lake Tanganyika is a large lake in central Africa (3° 20' to 8° 48' South and from 29° 5' to 31° 15' East). It is estimated to be the second largest freshwater lake in the world by volume, and the second deepest, in both cases after Lake Baikal in Siberia.[2] The lake is divided between four countries – Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Tanzania and Zambia, with the DRC (45%) and Tanzania (41%) possessing the majority of the lake. The water flows into the Congo River system and ultimately into the Atlantic Ocean.

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Geography, Economie and Demographucs of the DRC

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The Congo is situated at the heart of the west-central portion of sub-Saharan Africa and is bounded by (clockwise from the southwest) Angola, the Republic of Congo, the Central African Republic, the Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania across Lake Tanganyika, and Zambia. The country straddles the Equator, with one-third to the north and two-thirds to the south. The size of Congo, 2,345,408 square kilometres (905,567 sq mi), is comparable to that of Western Europe.

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